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Erik L'Heureux

Erik L'Heureux

National University of Singapore


SESSION: Hot Air: Decarbonization on the Equator

DATE: 05 MAY 2024 | TIME: 11.00 - 12.00









Hot Air: Decarbonization on the Equator.


Erik L’Heureux (PhD) FAIA will present two adaptive reuse projects that deliver NetZero energy

and super low embodied carbon transformations on the equator. The case studies illustrate

integrated design ideas based on decarbonization, filtering, thermal calibration, and climatic

comfort. The case studies will show how our collective carbon legacy in the built environment

can be used as the foundation for a decarbonized future.


 

ABOUT SPEAKER



Erik G. L'Heureux (PhD) FAIA, LEED AP BD+C is an award-winning American architect and academic

leader based in Singapore. Through his creative design practice, Erik specializes in designing for the

dense equatorial city, using simple monolithic forms and delicate veils to calibrate architecture to

the hot air of the urban equator in delightful and surprising ways. Erik has led the design of the

adaptive reuse of the Department of Architecture and the Yusof Ishah Student Commons at NUS

transforming them into NetZero and super low carbon buildings. In addition to his many design

awards, Erik received the Wheelwright Prize from Harvard University and was elevated to the

College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 2020.

The author of Renovating Carbon (2023), Drawing Climate (2021), and the monograph Deep Veils

(2014) he has published more than 20 articles, including "Climatic Design and Its Others" (2020) in

the Journal of Architectural Education. Over the past decade, Erik has served the National University

of Singapore as Vice Dean, Special Projects (2018-2021), Master of Architecture Program Director

(2020-2022), and the BA Architecture program director (2015-2020). As a Dean's Chair Associate

Professor, he teaches the next generation of architects to be committed to decarbonization and

planet-positive design action calibrated to the equator.




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